January 2004
Color, Color, Color By Catherine Evans

No more dull, dark and dreary colors, consumers are looking towards a brighter future.

I travel to numerous garden centers and trade shows every year, studying all of the trends, displays, customer service ideas — basically everything that has to do with the industry. The thing that I have been noticing the most in the last year is a lot of bright, cheery colors. There are oranges, reds, yellows, blues, greens, etc., that are just exploding off the shelves. And you can find these bright colors on everything from gifts to tools to plants. A wide range of products are just brightening up garden centers.

I keep hearing from garden centers and manufacturers that people are sick and tired of feeling down from all of the things happening in the world right now. They are using upbeat colors everywhere around their homes and gardens to try to keep their minds off of the situation. People are staying home more, spending more time in their gardens, so why not add some things to make that space even more cheerful and comforting.

Whether it is a birdfeeder, fountain, garden stake or plant, if it catches the eye and finds its way to the register, that is defiantly something that should be explored. It does not matter whether it is a small item or a large one; I hear the same thing: Customers just want to see something pop in their gardens. And putting that item in your store might just be the ticket to a color-schemed success!

1. Recliner

This unique outdoor recliner features a colorful blend of exotic hardwoods. It’s designed to conform to your body for optimum comfort and folds flat for easy storage and mobility. Balamine Products. (817) 847-1810.

2. Resin cube

The Lumière line is handcrafted in Thailand from the highest grade of resin. The collection is available in four colors: Kiwi Green, Thai Tangerine, White Star and Aqueous Blue. Easy to care for; let them age naturally or restore the original patina with a few drops of olive oil and rub with a soft cloth. BroCars International Trading Inc. (800) 966-1496.

3. Planters

This new range of Tropical Glazes is from the Marco Polo Collection of Stoneware Planters. There are five new tropical colors including Tropical Red (pictured), Tropical Yellow, Tropical Green, Tropical Blue and Tropical Brown. The rich, subtle glazes with black accents are an innovative addition to the 2004 market. International Pottery Alliance. (877) 544-0472.

4. Containers

The Official Initials collection has a unique combination of old world craftsmanship and bright, contemporary colors with stenciled initials, numbers and words. These handcrafted pieces are very sturdy and functional. Brockseptember. (256) 534-0444.

5. Bird Feeder

This colorful bird feeder will never fade, even in the brightest sunlight. The genuine, stained glass cardinal design has a seed pan with drainage holes. The entire glass and copper feeder can be cleaned with a garden hose. More than 30 designs are available, including dragonflies, hummingbirds and garden fairies. Gallery Art Glass Inc. (800) 752-9146.

6. Mat

Coir mats come in 20 different designs that include ladybugs (shown), tree frogs, chili peppers, dragonflies, monkeys, watermelons and many more. Country Originals, Inc. (800) 249-4229.

7. Hummingbird feeder

Hand-painted violets decorate this feeder’s 8-oz. glass nectar container. The feeder has a powder-coated copper base with four bee-resistant flower-feeding stations. An integrated perch invites hummingbirds to sit and dine. The feeder has bilingual English/French packaging. Opus Inc. (508) 966-0470.

8. Pottery

This collection of pottery is imported directly from Thailand, Vietnam and China. Shown are a few of the many styles, textures and colors that are available in the 2004 catalog. You can offer your customers a unique selection of glazed or rustic pots, jars and planters. Asian Ceramics. (626) 449-6800.

9. Placemats

Homegrown is a set of six placemats designed by artist Kate Sellers-Jones. They are laminated onto cork-backed masonite and finished with a UV varnish, ensuring durability and quality. The square mats measure 11 x 11 inches. The set of six is sold with six different patterns: pear, pomegranate, peas, pumpkin, artichoke and fig. Earthly Things. (773) 486-8049.

10. Feeder tree

The Camden feeder tree is made from kiln-dried pine on a pressure-treated pine base and a bracket of hand-forged steel. It stands 6 feet, 9 inches tall and is handcrafted in Maine. The Garden Path. (207) 439-8368.

11. Bee-resistant feeder

The Conifer hummingbird feeder blends with natural surroundings, has a 16-oz. capacity and is intended for use with non-colored home-made nectar. The feeder features three snap-in bee-resistant nectar ports, a large mouth and snap apart base for easy cleaning. Bird Company. (800) 269-4450.

12. Wall fountain

The Tree of Life wall fountain measures 47 x 24 inches. Water spouts from the beak of three birds: one on each side of the shell and one at the base of a tree of delicate, hand-tooled leaves. To operate, simply hang the fountain, fill with water and plug into a grounded outlet. Florentine Craftsmen. (800) 971-7600.

13. Hummingbird feeder

This new line of hummingbird feeders features unique designs in glass, in 11 new imported glass models. The Heritage Hummer family will include fruits, cosmic, swirls and decorative feeders. All products will be individually boxed in attractive retail packaging. Heritage Farms. (800) 845-2473.

14. Planters

The Lechuza product line combines the latest European sub-irrigation technology with a clean modern design to produce a functional, self-watering, decorative container. Planters come in three different styles — Classico, Quadro and Cubico — all with the appearance of ceramic and the benefits of plastic. They are lightweight, unbreakable and colorfast. Offered in up to eight different sizes ranging from 81/2 to 28 inches, with up to 10 different color options. Bernecker’s Nursery. (800) 288-7256.





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